Mountain huckleberry scones make the perfect late summer treat.

Mountain Huckleberries

Have you ever had a mountain huckleberry before? They look similar to blueberries and, while they come from the same genus, they are not the same. Huckleberries have a more complex flavor, they are sweet but have a slight sourness to them without being tart. Learn all about the mountain huckleberry and how to identify it Here.

This time of year is teaming with fresh food. We go out every couple days to pick wild food and fill the pantry with jams and canned fruit for future pies. The mountain huckleberry isn’t one we find often, at least not in large amounts. They are out there but just not on our regular ventures. Instead I source these beautiful gems from the farmers market where there is a booth dedicated to foraged foods. Getting foraged foods without doing the work might feel like cheating but I think it is a blessing.


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Making Scones

Scones are one of the easiest things to make if you ask me, as long as you use cold butter and don’t over mix you end up with a good product. And if you don’t? Just cover it in butter and whatever you’d like and it still works. The only real problem I have had with scones in the past is they can end up dry, however making fruit or vegetable filled scones usually makes this problem disappear. Just don’t accidentally exchange the baking powder for baking soda because your bulk bags are mislabeled, there is no going back from that. Don’t ask me how I know.

cubed up butter
Cold cubed butter


When it comes to mixing the dough make sure you don’t over work it. Every time I read this in a recipe I get a little frustrated, what does that even mean!? Well in this case it means, you stir to combine but that’s it. After cutting in the butter you add all the wet ingredients and fold them in gently, be sure to avoid vigorous stirring. The goal is to get it all mixed together but not fully incorporated, your end dough is not going to be consistent. Do not knead the dough, press it together into a ball so it all sticks together, form it into a patty and cut it.

The more you work the dough the more you develop the gluten and, since this isn’t going to rise the way bread does, that gluten will make it tough instead of flaky.

How to Make Mountain Huckleberry Scones

bowl with flour and spices on a cutting board with cubbed butter and measuring spoons
All the ingredients waiting to be combined.
  1. Mix all your dry ingredients into a bowl, flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, cinnamon and nutmeg.
  2. Cut the butter into the flower mixture until the butter is in small pieces, pea sized is good.
  3. Wisk the egg in a separate bowl with the milk.
  4. Add milk and egg to the flour mixture, then add in huckleberries.
  5. Fold the mixture together to combine, do not over mix.
  6. Once it starts to come together use your hands to form the dough into a ball. Do not knead.
  7. Press the dough into a disk shape and cut into wedges.
  8. Place on greased cooking sheet or cast iron pan.
  9. Sprinkle with brown sugar and cinnamon.
  10. Bake at 400 ° for 15 minutes or until the top is a nice golden brown.

adding huckleberries into dough in bowl
Adding the wet ingredients to the dry
dough
A very loose ball of dough ready to be shaped

Baking

You can bake a scone on anything, I used to use a cookie sheet which is probably the most common. I have also used a glass pie plate and a cake pan but my favorite is a cast iron pan. Although a cast iron pan is what I use to cook everything anyway. I form my dough into a disk slightly smaller then the pan then, when placing the pieces in, I just space them out a little bit. This recipe will not spread much.

huckleberry scones backed in cast iron pan
Scones in a buttered cast iron pan waiting for the oven

Mountain Huckleberry scones served warm with butter

huckleberry scone cut in half with butter on wooden plate
Fresh warm scone with butter

These scones don’t need any help when it comes to flavor. You can make them a glaze for the top or serve with jam spread over them but its not really necessary. We like them warm and fresh from the oven, cut in half and covered in butter. The warm squishy inside soaks up the butter while the slight crisp outside makes for a satisfying bite.

Now that I have finished writing this post I am going to make another batch because these pictures are making my mouth water.

mountain huckleberry scones on a wooden plate
mountain huckleberry scones
mountain huckleberry scones on a wooden plate

Mountain Huckleberry Scones

Mountain huckleberries in a soft yet flakey scone with a slightly crusted outside.
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Course Breakfast
Servings 8

Ingredients
  

  • 3 cups All purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup Brown Sugar
  • 4 tsp Baking Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 3/4 cup unsalted butter cold
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1 cup Mountain Huckleberries or 1/2 pint
  • extra sugar and cinnamon for sprinkling

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 400 °
  • Pour dry ingredients into a bowl, flour, sugar, salt, backing powder, cinnamon and nutmeg.
  • Cut the butter into the flower mixture until the butter is in small pieces, pea sized is good.
  • Wisk the egg in separate bowl, mix in milk.
  • Pour milk and egg to the flour mixture, add in huckleberries.
  • Fold the mixture together to combine, do not over mix.
  • Once it starts to come together use your hands to form the dough into a ball. Do not knead.
  • Press the dough into a disk shape and cut into wedges.
  • Place on greased cooking sheet or cast iron pan.
  • Sprinkle with brown sugar and cinnamon.
  • Bake at 400 ° for 15 minutes or until the top is a nice golden brown.
Keyword foraged, huckleberry, scones, wild food

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